Geddy Lee on Unreleased Rush Music: "There's Actually Not Much in the Vaults"

"We were a band that used what we wrote, and if we didn't like what we were writing, we stopped writing it"
Geddy Lee on Unreleased Rush Music: 'There's Actually Not Much in the Vaults'
As some of Canada's most storied songwriters and bands move to share scores of unreleased material, Geddy Lee has noted that there isn't much music Rush fans haven't already heard from their own vault.

Asked by the National Post whether or not the power trio had any material that had yet to see the light of day, Lee admitted, "There's actually not much in the vaults."

"We were a band that used what we wrote, and if we didn't like what we were writing, we stopped writing it," the frontman explained. "So there are really no unreleased Rush songs that were worth a damn. Recording our songs was so difficult and ambitious that we didn't do extra stuff and pick the best."

Lee was asked to reflect on how the trio have become adored by generations of listeners. He explained, "We had a long career; we always went our own way; we weren't afraid to laugh at ourselves — that sense of humour was definitely something we made sure was present in our lives shows.

"I think the camaraderie we had for so many years — we really were very close friends. Alex and I still are. I think that struck home with a lot of fans. People like to see long marriages and long relationships, people who work together without acrimony. Maintaining that civility and friendship, I think appealed to people because everyone wishes to be in that kind of situation."

Lee was also asked about the possibility of new material. His first and only solo album, 2000's My Favourite Headache, was issued on vinyl for the first time last year as part of Record Store Day.

"I'm very proud of it — it's a very intricate record, a deep record, and a lot of love and passion went into it," Lee said of the effort. "It did get me thinking that one day I'd like to take that on the road, so you never know. But I have no firm plans to do anything right now. It's not a time when one can plan much, so only time will tell if that comes to fruition."

Lee noted that he'll pick up the bass at home "to keep my fingers juiced but that's about as far as I'm going right now with it." Recently, he's spent time touring behind his Big Book of Beautiful Bass, which explored his collection of instruments and the stories behind them.

Rush drummer and primary lyricist Neil Peart passed away in January at age 67, following a battle with brain cancer. A tribute in the drummer's hometown of St. Catharines was recently rescheduled for 2021.