Pig Destroyer Terrifyer

Pig Destroyer Terrifyer
Always one of Relapse’s most terrifying, the elusive entity known as Pig Destroyer have finally returned with their long-awaited new studio full-length. The freaky Virginian trio once again lay waste to everything with these 20 tracks; although no huge progression in sound has been made, the speedy grind/punk and raging hardcore/metal sounds perfect as always, with the requisite odd, clean production sound intact. No regard whatsoever for memorable songs or current musical trends, this is pure, sincere extreme music. Definitely not trying to out-tech any of the current mathcore scene, the band nonetheless continually comes up with off-kilter song structures, with twisting, angular riffs and manic drumming propelling each short song. What pushes the Pigs over the top are the poetic and disturbing lyrics of screamer J.R. Hayes; somewhere between suicide notes and apology letters, it helps make Terrifyer a more cathartic album than the usual metal lyrical fare. The disc also includes "Natasha,” a 37-minute song/exercise in sonic terrorism (and patience), mixed in 5.1 audio, whatever the heck that actually is. While Terrifyer may not break any new ground, it is still highly recommended; this band is always one step ahead of most in many unsettling ways.

Where did the idea for the 37-minute 5.1 audio track come from? What the hell does that really mean? J.R.: "Natasha" was [guitarist] Scott Hull’s idea originally, and we just kind of had fun with it and made it up as we went along. It's pretty dense, there's a lot of subtle and subliminal layers that you don't catch on the first couple listens. Hopefully people will connect with it. I don't know that much about 5.1 to be honest; that's more of Scott's deal. He wanted to try mixing something in a surround sound format. He's always trying to challenge himself.

Do you ever find it limiting working within the grind/punk framework? I don't think music has any limits. We just try to go with our instincts and play what we want to play, not what we think other people want us to play. Once you start thinking like that, you cease to be an artist and you become a performer. I don't have any interest in that.

One thing I love about PD is the disturbing and very unique lyrical approach. What inspired the lyrics this time around? A couple of broken hearts and ten tons of self-loathing. (Relapse)