Watch the Trailer for George Martin's 'Soundbreaking' PBS Series

Watch the Trailer for George Martin's 'Soundbreaking' PBS Series

Music makers and fans alike were saddened by the loss of iconic producer George Martin last week, when he died at the age of 90. And while there's no chance of Martin's musical fingerprints disappearing from the pop music canon any time soon, there will be a new way to remember his work thanks to an upcoming PBS series.
 
Before his death, Martin and his son Giles teamed up with the public broadcaster to create an eight-part series called Soundbreaking: Stories from the Cutting Edge of Recorded Music, which hears more than 150 artists sharing behind-the-scenes stories from the studio.
 
The first two episodes are slated to premiere later today (March 14) at SXSW, with the full show airing on PBS beginning in November.
 
The series will include interviews with a huge amount of music figures, including Paul McCartney, Tom Petty, Roger Waters, Roger Daltrey, Dave Grohl, Questlove, Bon Iver, Willie Nelson, Beck, Beastie Boys' Adam "Ad Rock" Horovitz, Joni Mitchell, Debbie Harry, Darryl "DMC" McDaniels, Mark Knopfler,  Brian Eno, Nile Rodgers, Quincy Jones, Rick Rubin, Tony Visconti, RZA, Daniel Lanois, and Mark Ronson.
 
Additionally, an entire episode of the show will be devoted to Martin's work with the Beatles — a point in his career that affectionately earned him the title of "the fifth Beatle."
 
"Soundbreaking afforded me the opportunity to tell the story of the creative process of so many of the artists I have worked with throughout my life," Martin previously said in a statement about the show.
 
The first look at the new series has arrived with an official trailer [via Rolling Stone]. It features clips from Ringo Starr, Elton John, Bonnie Raitt, Paul Epworth, Ben Harper, Chuck D, St. Vincent and more.
 
In light of Martin's recent passing, the show's creators have also compiled a video tribute of artists from the series discussing Martin's impact on music.
 
Watch both videos below.