Lina Allemano Four Jargon

Lina Allemano Four Jargon
These four musicians know each other and their music so well it's as if they are always soloing, playing backgrounds and commenting on one another's playing. While most of seven tracks are in the free-jazz vein of Ornette Coleman, first tune "Cannonball Adderly's Tattoo" sounds straight out of the George Russell playbook. Trumpeter Allemano writes demanding tunes that require adherence to mood and structure, as well as attentive interplay, which she gets in spades from drummer Nick Fraser, who sometimes sounds like he's channelling Ed Blackwell: always a good thing. Alto saxophonist Brodie West's quizzical, dry, John Tchicai-ish sound, as on "Sling Slang," sounds like he's asking a question then answering it with his humorous, utterly personal style, which doesn't resort to cliché, an extraordinary accomplishment. Throughout the ensemble passages, bassist Andrew Downing is a model of muscular support. But he's so confident in his judgment he can stop playing entirely and his decision is felt as further accompaniment. Allemano's playing is confident, direct, expansive and angularly melodic throughout the set. The compositions range from playful to meditative to sweltering, all strong, well developed and realized. Catch this band live if you can. (Lumo)