License To Drive Greg Beeman

License To Drive Greg Beeman
With freedom comes responsibility, which, according to Greg Beeman's (Nash Bridges, Melrose Place) '80s teen comedy, is why you need a "license to drive." You see, beyond phallus stature and a superficial representation of identity for those lacking self-confidence, the car represents freedom. But as Corey Haim learns when he takes out his grandfather's car to impress Heather Graham, even though he failed his driver's test, there are many strings attached to freedom. You can't just go crazy with it or you might get in trouble, or leave your pregnant mother without transportation to the hospital when she goes into labour. Sadly, that's as deep as this awkward, failed John Hughes facsimile attempt at comedy gets, featuring teenagers being vulgar and superficial without any sense of humanizing introspection or veiled sweetness. These characters are nasty, selfish and stupid, showing remorse only when their quotidian complacency is threatened. Of course, it has that nostalgia vibe, being one of the handful of movies that featured "the Coreys," before they turned into a collective hyperbole of social animosity and celebrity worship turned venomous, which should have some appeal to the nine people that cared about The Lost Boys: The Tribe. As far as a cinematic text, the only thing interesting about License to Drive is seeing Corey Haim and Heather Graham kiss, noting what eventually became of their respective careers, along with a yearbook image of a young woman named "Tina Krapper." More interesting than the film are the DVD supplements, where Corey Haim discusses having mono while shooting and his great friendship with Feldman, which amusingly contradicts Feldman's dialogue about having the lead role stolen from him and reluctantly shooting a film he didn't care about. There's also a commentary track with director Greg Beeman that's far more enthusiastic than it should be. (Anchor Bay)