Yellow Wood Son of the Oppressor

Yellow Wood Son of the Oppressor
As Canadian indie rock developed its unique identity over the last decade, music born out of Ontario's industrial sectors, like that from Hamilton's Junior Boys and Oshawa's Cuff the Duke, has concurrently followed the American model. Add Windsor's Yellow Wood to this list, as their debut LP, Son of the Oppressor, deftly combs through an astonishing selection of genres, modes and models. Son of the Oppressor's most attractive trait is its wild abandon, as the Rideout brothers strive to sound majestic, silly, pretentious, working-class, lethargic and ambitious all at once. "Chinese Women Unite" stands as the most urgent song on the album ― cymbals crash, beats syncopate and melodies soar. Further exploring musical territories through the mousy electronics of "Tay Tales," the noise overload of "MABM" and the Brit-sized arena rock of "We Can All Be Friends," Yellow Wood might just stand as indie rock's greatest genre unifier, north of Blitzen Trapper. (Relay)