The Wolfnote's Manifesto

The Wolfnote's Manifesto
"It's something that people can either take or leave," Bryan Kulba says. "I don't think we're revolutionary, we're just saying, ‘Be yourself and stick up for your opinions,'" Expanding on the band's current musical manifesto, the guitarist continues: "I don't need a band to advocate overthrowing the government. I would advocate overthrowing anything you can. Any little bit of overthrowing in your life is probably a positive thing."

Over the course of their nearly four-year existence, these Edmonton, Alberta mavericks have emerged as one of the hardest working indie bands Canada has to offer (three Canadian tours, two full-lengths and three EPs). And the hard work is paying off. Their latest full-length, Sacred Bodies (on Black Box Recordings), was recorded with infamous producer Alex Newport (At The Drive-In, the Locust) and is the group's most potent effort of contradictorily spastic but danceable noise yet. But while there are an ever-increasing number of bands plying a similar style (if with nowhere near the same ability, conviction and passion), an aspect that has always separated the Wolfnote from the pack has been their manifesto behind the music.

"We've been conscious of trying to break down the whole idea of ‘band on a stage, people on the ground,'" Kulba says. "We really like the idea of playing on the floor, of the people who come to see us being as much a part of the experience as we are. The main part of our ‘manifesto' is keeping everybody on the same level. It's a lame thing when one year a band is exactly the same as you and the next they're on MuchMusic and they don't return your calls. The one thing I dislike about punk rock these days is that it's taken so out of context; it's more important to lead by example rather than yell things at kids. We've realised that our actions and personalities are more effective in getting our ideas out than anything we can say on a CD."