Wild Nothing Golden Haze

Wild Nothing Golden Haze
Having released one of the strongest records of 2010 this past spring, Jack Tatum returns before year's end with an attractive six-song EP. Sounding like overflow from the Gemini recording sessions, Golden Haze offers more of the same: heavenly production, wispy melodies and throwbacks to basically every British artist that qualified as indie two to three decades ago. The title track, for instance, fades with shimmering guitars, employing the technique Johnny Marr perfected for virtually every Smiths record. Tatum then swaps iconic '80s trademarks for a New Order-y blend of keyboards and droning bass on "Quiet Hours" and the Cure's smiling gloom on "Asleep." It isn't until "Vultures Like Lovers" where they begin to shed the obvious influences with some shuddering reverb and echoed-out drums that aren't as directly connected to any previous act. Still, whether Wild Nothing expose or hide their inspirations isn't important, what they've done in a couple singles, an EP and a full-length has been so consistently harmonious and flawless it's immaterial. Although half of its songs were previously released as the Evertide EP on the Warmest Chord label earlier in the year, Golden Haze is a far more rewarding and complete release that lives up to its titular promise. (Captured Tracks)