Ursula Bogner Sonne = Blackbox

Ursula Bogner Sonne = Blackbox
Curated by Andrew Pekler and Jan Jelinek (who also runs the Faitiche label), this second album by Ursula Bogner is difficult to de-contextualize and review purely on its aural merits. The previous 2009 release, Recordings 1969-1988, purported to be a discovery of unheard recordings made by "housewife" Bogner, raised many doubts of authenticity. This iteration includes a 130-page book that delves into the issues of text media's intersection with music, as well as studies of identity, gender and so on. Whether a document or impersonation of vintage electronics, the pieces nail the kitchen sink experimentation of squared waves and magnetic tape cut-ups. Female voices, both singing and speaking, are razored and layered into a proto-AGF chorus of stutters and tones. The clean edits, tight loops and submerged funkiness of production do betray modern technology playing some part. As a sound experience, it is both brainy and quaint, but as conceptual art, it has a greater depth worth exploring. (Faitiche)