To Kill A Petty Bourgeoisie Marlone

To Kill A Petty Bourgeoisie Marlone
For their second full-length, Minnesota duo Jehna Wilhelm, and Mark McGee have kept the spectral qualities from The Patron but appear much less concerned with demolishing their haunted house to get out. Their wracked electronics have been largely replaced by ominous drones and tension-building drums and strings that recall 28 Days Later's moody soundtrack (viz. "The Needle"). The quieter moments diverge into branches of minimalism that are both restrained yet suffused with little vapours of sound. In their tempered grandeur it reminds a little of labelmates Autistic Daughters' carefully controlled constructions. "Turritopsis" is the lone callback to Jenha, as a house siren in a hammer and anvil party gone wrong. A greater trust in melody and simple musical ideas opens a door into these pieces, and by the time the lights are out and chains are rattling it's too late to turn back. Fans of funhouse thrills ― the throaty wails, the distorting mirrors, the murky mists ― will never consider fleeing though. (Kranky)