Tachichi & Moves Lobstermania

Tachichi & Moves Lobstermania
Promo started for the newest album from Tachichi and Moves more than a year ago when the long-standing duo released a video for "The Sarah Palin Song" and another for the first verse of "Joy to Rhythm," the album version of the latter also featuring Cee!!!!!!!! closing out the song with a political rant rap. T does get a jab in on Stephen Harper on that song, but the majority of his politics come out on "The Sarah Palin Song," a diss to the ex-Alaskan Governor over a lullaby beat that's a nice change of pace from the rapper's usual topics of booze, broads and bragging. Tachichi's evolved his recognizable style, an elastic flow that suddenly, tongue-twistingly speeds up or pauses, sounding best on minimal beats where he has room to manoeuvre and on fist-pumping bangers he can just tear apart. Moves provides the hard jams with head banger "Imminent Threat" and the g-funky "Please Believe Me," Tachichi sharing the latter with White Kong (aka Kunga219) and Fatt Matt, while guest producer Rhek provides the fast, funky opening, "Lobstermania Intro," which perfectly sets the mood for the rest of the album. "Ain't The Dough" and "So Much Time" (featuring D-Vice) aren't only minimal Moves beats, they also have a feel of the early productions he provided to T. Other highlights include self-proclaimed "crowd pleaser" "Break Lobster," a funky jam with electric blues guitar and yet another awesome guest verse from Ghettosocks, as well as club jam/drinking anthem "College Chick" and radio jam "Real in the Field," a groovy Gordski production with Kaleb Simmonds (best known as a contestant on the second season of Canadian Idol) adding his soulful vocals to the hook and throughout the background. Lobstermania is a well-balanced album, maybe the duo's best since they debuted in the late-'90s with their Truth of the Trade tape, and it's available for free from Low Pressure. (Low Pressure)