Surachai To No Avail

Surachai To No Avail
The New Yorker recently annoyed metal fans with their observations on the U.S. black metal scene ― there's inevitably some ire when a mainstream publication tries to explain an extreme musical genre. However, while the writer did an okay job, they didn't mention Surachai, which could be a blessing in disguise. To No Avail is excellent and yes, "American," in a sense, as the one-man masterpiece borrows from other musical genres to create stellar, unique music, versus heavily relying on the traditional norms found in European-based black metal. The desolateness, urgency and brutality of American Black metal are clearly palatable, as well as a commonality within the vocal style. But what Surachai adds is an electronic, yet gritty, underbelly that's slightly industrial in nature. In To No Avail, every instrument is provided space to breathe, not hidden under urgent (and usually monotonous) riffage that often separates black metal from other sub-genres. Sure, Surachai deserves the publicity, but unlike the other bands mentioned in the piece, this isn't a trend ― this is art that will live past the hype. (Handshake Inc.)