Some Girls Are Better Than Others

Some Girls Are Better Than Others
When "hardcore" began charting on Billboard, filling arenas and airing on MuchMusic, those who cut their teeth on the real thing quickly detached themselves from the new, commercially viable scene. San Diego's Some Girls fell into such a position, but according to vocalist Wes Eisold, the idea was to be fresh and removed from any scene or preconceived notions from the start. "What we do comes quite naturally; we just play music we want to play that we don't feel is completely contrived," he says. "I understand that [hardcore] is still fun for some people, but I think it's unnecessary and totally unprogressive."

Featuring members of luminary acts like Give Up the Ghost, the Plot to Blow Up the Eiffel Tower and the Locust, this San Diego-based band have been fighting the good fight against cookie-cutter hardcore bands since their inception in 2001. By using twisted dynamics, boundlessly punishing guitar attacks and Eisold's primal scream of cerebral lyrics, the five-piece have found the means of defying links to any kind of musical movement. "We're tied to the hardcore scene just because of the past bands we've been in, but I don't understand what that word and what the hardcore scene means at this point," Eisold says.

Finding a home with the diverse-of-late Epitaph, the five-piece have an Alex Newport-produced new album in Heaven's Pregnant Teens, which is ready to obliterate any pigeonholes aimed at the band. A 25-minute aural assault that is book-ended by the ultra-violent, blazing guitars of "Beautiful Rune" and the relentless, nine-minute cyclic blast of "Deathface," Teens is a diamond in the rough for aggressive music. "It's not like we try to write something that is bizarre compared to a traditional hardcore song or anything like that," explains Eisold. "But what's been done fantastically a million times over has nothing to do with what we want to do."