SIANspheric Are Sounding Off

SIANspheric Are Sounding Off
"We've really been into minimalist composers like Steve Reich. We're totally inspired by his use of applying many layers of sound," explains Sean Ramsay, guitarist/vocalist of the acclaimed space rock unit Sianspheric. This month, Sonic Unyon releases their newest and best album to date, The Sound of the Colour of the Sun, and it contains more than just "many" layers. Along with original guitarist Paul Sinclair returning to the fold, there are enough layers within it to ordain them as Ministers of "The Antithetical Society Against Sonic Transparency."

The record forces people to listen at an entirely different level; it shifts from the gentle to the abrasive. "Tous Les Soirs," with its long strokes of ambient-drenched guitar, guides the listener to space through sepia-toned nostalgia and longing until the secondary rockets abruptly ignite. A loud, abrasively glistening guitar takes over, jolting the listener. "It's one of our favourite sounding songs on the record — we perfectly captured the dynamic of our live show down to tape." "QFD" is a stellar march features drumming that is an attack of dirty, distant thudding. "People like to hear the drums loud — we didn't want the drums to sound like drums — we instead just wanted to provide a bass rhythm. In the context of your typical production, others think it doesn't make sense- but we feel it's right," Ramsay exposes.

Despite feeling satisfied by the recording methods of producer Al Okada and engineer Nick Holmes, the band remixed the album at Ramsay's home studio. "I don't think we all had the same idea. I think we're still at the point where we're arrogant enough to think that we know what's best and how things should sound and it just wasn't coming along the way we wanted to."

Musically and sonically, TSTCTS has a perfect balance between the deep-gloss of Somnium and the deep-space radio telescope static textures of There's Always Someplace You'd Rather Be. The allegory was made that already sounds like a well-worn scratchy vinyl copy of anyone's all-time favourite record, except that it's new and etched onto CD. It was safe to assume that even from afar, a long grin could be detected; one that extended farther than the cables that connected our telephones. "We wanted to wake people up and make them think about what was actually going on," states a highly reassuring Ramsay. "That's something we were totally looking to do."