Shook Ones’ Chance of a Lifetime

Shook Ones’ Chance of a Lifetime
Shook Ones aren’t here to redefine the punk rock wheel. "In the beginning of this band, the whole point was to be a Lifetime rip-off, and take that as far as it could go,” laughs drummer Nate Huddle. One of New Jersey’s finest exports, Lifetime carried the flag for melodic hardcore in the 1990s, long before the prevalence of eye shadow and Jack Skeleton lunchboxes became par for the punk course. Broken up by 1997, the band’s musical legacy was stunted by the growing popularity of other, more aggressive punk offshoots.

"When we tour the U.S., a lot of bands have a similar vibe. There’s a lot of metalcore,” Huddle explains. "It’s something I’m tired of. I find melodic music a lot more interesting.” With their second full-length release, Facetious Folly Feat, Shook Ones have firmly established themselves as leaders — along with a recently reunited Lifetime — in the re-emerging melodic hardcore scene. At the same time, the band remain very much aware of their roots, citing their lone influence as Lifetime co-founder and guitarist Dan Yemin, and describing their sound as "Dan Yemin after eating an apple.”

"At this point, it’s been a few years, and it’s kind of a joke. Mostly,” laughs Huddle. "It was funny then, and it’s pretty much still funny now.” The band sell themselves short with such tongue-in-cheek descriptions, since their latest material demonstrates a real growth in their sound. Still true to their roots, Shook Ones have developed their own style that deviates from that of genre forebears.

"We all contributed to writing this record, and I think each song sounds is a little different, and has a little bit of the personality and musical taste of the person who wrote it,” says Huddle. "I think it kept the record interesting.”