Said the Whale New Brighton

Said the Whale New Brighton
For anyone who fell in love with Said the Whale's sophomore record, Islands Disappear, first spins of their new four-track EP will come as a bit of a shock. While that album's specificity of place is what drew many in, New Brighton refuses to saddle any of its songs with a set location. But if the novelty of hearing the changing landscape of Vancouver's False Creek set music was all Islands Disappear had going for it, the record would never have been the slow burning sensation it was. New Brighton sticks with the rest of Said the Whale's hallmarks – the savvy mix of indie and folk rock, soaring harmonies and quirky, observational lyrics – seeming to indicate that their third effort won't veer too far from the formula that brought them national acclaim. Their songwriting, which was already top-notch, has improved, creating a tight quartet of indie pop gems. The sprightly pace and sunny demeanour of "Lines" is the clear highlight, while the start-stop rhythm of "Sandy Bay Fishing Song" shows that the group aren't afraid to venture into relatively foreign sonic territory while retaining their innate tunefulness. New Brighton comes across as lightweight at first, but repeated listens reveal these songs' nostalgic depths. (Hidden Pony)