The Rolling Stones Sue German Clothing Company over Use of Tongue Logo

The Rolling Stones Sue German Clothing Company over Use of Tongue Logo
The folks at Germany's New Yorker fashion line probably should have seen this one coming, but they have been sued by the Rolling Stones for using the band's iconic tongue logo on their advertising posters and clothing tickets.

The company has apparently already been forced to remove 800 promotional posters and more than 3,000 clothing tags that feature the logo. The band's reps at the Netherlands-based firm Musidor BV are seeking a £210,000 ($338,129) settlement, plus a £17,000 ($27,372) fine.

A spokesperson from the group told the UK's Sun newspaper, "As with any band or major brand, we will be fiercely protective of our commercial properties, be that songs, gigs or logos. If we didn't chase up improper use, it would set a dangerous precedent."

Still, New Yorker's CEO Fritz Knapp isn't accepting any blame. He said, "The tongue is not the Stones' alone. The posters were made by our creative department. I won't let the Stones ban my tongue."

The tongue logo first appeared on the Rolling Stones' 1971 album Sticky Fingers.