Red Chord Clients

Red Chord Clients
Their recent transition to Metal Blade prompted much speculation on this acclaimed group’s future direction, but rest assured, not a whole lot has changed in the Red Chord camp. In fact, the group have managed to improve and cleverly tweak their sound just enough to avoid stagnancy without alienating their atypically diverse fan base. On their much-lauded Robotic Empire debut, Fused Together in Revolving Doors, the group seamlessly fused crushing metallic hardcore with blisteringly technical death/grind, and a touch of old school on both ends of the equation. The monolithic, battering groove of the last release is still in abundance, although a noteworthy amount of care has been added to avoid slipping into the realms of generic mosh — there are very few all out throw down moments at all. Guy Kozowyk’s vocals have become slightly more hardcore oriented, with more frequent spoken word and an overall less controlled and calculated approach. On the other hand, the production and mixing is extremely clear, and the drum kit has a distinctly "death metal” tone — triggered and polished. Essentially, the Red Chord have honed their sound down, eliminated all predictable transitions (with the exception of "Antman,” no doubt an upcoming live favourite), and released a record that is just as cerebral and thought-provoking as it is defiant to the current redundancy of metal and hardcore.

What made Metal Blade a good choice for you? Kozowyk: The main reason would be the fact that we trust them; they’re really honest, hardworking people. With running a label on my own, I definitely wanted to go somewhere we felt comfortable. I’m not saying that all other labels are dishonest, but Metal Blade and I have a very open relationship, and I felt less apprehensive sticking my name on a Metal Blade deal for five years or whatever. Metal Blade are much more about the band building their success through touring, and are willing to suck it up a little bit, which is what my label (Black Market Activities) is all about as well.

The lyrics on the first disc had a thought provoking, yet tongue-in-cheek feel. How would you describe the lyrical approach on the new disc? Everyone has their own little quirk, and others just choose not to understand it sometimes. I encounter a lot of drunks, drug addicts and homeless people where I work, and pretty much every song on the disc is about a different person I’ve encountered in one way or another. "Fixation on Plastics” is pretty much the only song on the disc that is about something else — a guy who did a lecture I saw dedicating his life to the study of plastic. (Metal Blade)