Quantic Soul Orchestra Pushin' On

Quantic Soul Orchestra Pushin' On
Will Holland is an amazing producer in the electronic scene under the Quantic alias, but it seems that this young talent’s work with his Soul Orchestra is the outlet that is quickly exposing the Brighton-based prodigy to the rest of the world. And for good reason, as this follow-up to Stampede contains all the same elements that made his debut so engaging and funky, but now with twice as much Alice Russell. The phenomenal songstress returns to lend her captivating pipes to Holland’s compositions and gives further evidence that she could very well be the most soulful white woman in music today. Her impressive range is in full effect as Russell digs down deep to belt out a vintage Aretha Franklin style on the title track, but she also gives you goose bumps when she softens her tone for the lush strings that accompany her on "Feeling Good.” This record continues to create rich and organic grooves with the instrumentals, coming correct with the beautiful cinematic sounds of "Paintings and Journeys” and blowing the roof off with their heavy rendition of Mr. Scruff’s "Get a Move On.” Holland has delivered an impressive addition to an already fantastic discography of soul music that is equal parts vintage and contemporary. As young as this cat is, it’s exciting to think how far he’s going to stretch this sound.

Is Alice the perfect voice for your music? Will Holland: Yeah, definitely. She’s talented and humble and that’s what I need. Someone who’s raw, tells it like it is and soulful. I’ve travelled a lot with her and if she’s singing on the train, in the hotel or on stage, it’s always there. Almost the whole structure of pop music today is based around having backing tracks and vocoders, but this is a person who can truly sing and it’s getting back to that traditional thing of having talent before anything.

It’s heart-breaking that bands like Quantic Soul Orchestra are few and far between, especially since soul and funk used to be massive. It upsets me all the time. There’s no pride in musicianship anymore. It’s sad to think that era will never happen again, unless we get a power cut and everything has to go back to community-based music. That’s where all of these things came from and personally, the only thing I still see that existing in today is salsa. I guess there are others obviously, but for me jazz is a spectacle or an exhibition and young people aren’t going to jazz concerts and being involved, they’re just watching it or dancing to it. And the same with funk, but I still think it’s alive and relevant. (Ubiquity)