Peaches Impeach My Bush

Peaches Impeach My Bush
It’s been six years since Peaches sexed up electro pop. Not much has changed for Merrill Nisker since she released her first disc The Teaches of Peaches in 2000 — she’s still crude, rude and in your face. However, the world has changed dramatically since the current American president took office that same year, giving Peaches another Bush to talk about than her own. Like her last disc, Nisker kicks off with a short, but intense track ending with her announcing, "Impeach Bush.” It’s an invigorating start for an artist whose politics are usually of the sexual variety. Unfortunately, this is where her overt castigation of Bush ends. There are no cheeky anti-war songs or wordplays on Bush, Clinton or Rove — instead listeners get the same old Peaches singing about big dicks, gay sex, hetero sex and the list goes on. While it would have been refreshing to hear someone as clever as Peaches rail against the president, her regular raunchiness is still pretty entertaining. Musically, the Torontonian treads familiar ground with minimalist drum beats, catchy hooks and a few ear-splitting moments. Guests like Joan Jett, Josh Homme and Feist make appearances, which makes this solid affair that much more interesting. While some fans will be disappointed by the lack of innovation and somewhat misleading album title, Peaches still delivers a raucous and compelling effort.

You named your album Impeach My Bush, but most of the disc isn’t really about the president. Why? I thought that his name was perfect for what I’m doing. Who else can say, "Impeach Bush,” besides Peaches? I’ve never been overtly political I don’t sing about the church and the government aligning themselves together or about increasing oil prices, but I sing about one to one communication, about people trying to lose their fears of things. I’m one of those think globally, work locally kind of people.

In terms of the music, your sound hasn’t really changed much. That’s the problem; that’s a danger. Isn’t that everybody’s big fear? To become better but still exude what you want to give off.

Why did you decide to work with so many different artists this time around? I made two albums alone, basically. The first album was, "I’ve arrived here’s my peaches,” and the album cover was showing you the exact part where I was making the album from. The second album was like, "Oh yeah, you think I’m about this? Well what if I had a hairy face and called things ‘fatherfucker’ instead of ‘motherfucker’ and told you guys to shake your dick?” Now it’s time to start the revolution. People know who I am and they want to be involved. (XL)