New Release Updates: Simian Mobile Disco, Digitalism, Polyphonic Spree

New Release Updates: Simian Mobile Disco, Digitalism, Polyphonic Spree
Hotly tipped "new rave” remix/production duo Simian Mobile Disco have unveiled details of their anticipated debut album. After the demise of the brain-melting pop group Simian in 2005, members James Ford and James Shaw regrouped, added "Mobile” and "Disco” to their dead entity, and took off on the DJ and remix circuit. To date they’ve remixed the likes of Klaxons, the Rapture and the Go! Team, as well as released a few singles through the Kitsuné label, as well as Wichita, which will release their album. Attack Decay Sustain Release will hit shops in the UK on June 4, and will feature former singles "The Hustler,” "Tits & Acid,” and current single "It’s the Beat,” which features a guest appearance by the Go! Team’s MC Ninja. Barry Dobbin, former vocalist for Clor, Simian’s Simon Lord and Char Johnson will also appear.

Another anticipated night-on-the-tiles-oriented record is expected from German indie electro kings Digitalism. Garnering attention for remixing Test Icicles and the Futureheads, the team of Jens Moelle and Ismail Tuefekci have lined up May 21 for their debut album, titled Idealism. Released on Kitsuné/EMI, the album includes hits such as "Zdarlight” and "Jupiter Room,” and will be preceded by a new single called "Pogo on May 7. Moelle has described the record as "an attempt to reach out, and create structures, but also this space aspect, you depart from Earth to something new.” Umm… okay. A preview of the album can be enjoyed here.

Finally after three years the Polyphonic Spree will return with their third full-length album. Following up last year’s iTunes-only EP Wait, will be released on the band’s new home, TVT Records (their first two records were put out by their own Good label via Hollywood) some time in June. Produced by cult, I mean, band leader Tim DeLaughter, the album will feature 12 tracks in the usual disguise of "sections.” Of the album, DeLaughter says, "This recording was extremely challenging for us, songs had been developed [on the road] and were pretty much fully arranged before recording. "But it’s a very spontaneous album. We’d been off the road for a while, and all the players collaborated on the spot in the studio. When we listen back it feels like a diary more than anything else. It's painful and beautiful all at once.”