Murs Murray's Revenge

Murs Murray's Revenge
Revenge is a dish best served cold, and it doesn’t get much colder than this L.A. born and bred MC who describes himself as "the one chosen to break up the ice that got the rap world frozen.” Since the future classic 3:16, Murs has released another Felt project, made the movie Walk Like A Man and signed to Record Collection as both an artist and the label’s A&R consultant. After six indie releases and two on Def Jux it’s not surprising that Murray’s Revenge does not disappoint. 9th wonder is back as sole producer of the album and you can hear the magic vibe the duo share in the production. Ten tracks deep, Murs keeps it diverse and mainly non-autobiographical as he tells stories from other people’s experiences and perspectives and doesn’t swear or use the "N-word” once. He tackles the bullshit in rap on "Murray’s Law, while "Yesterday, Today” is about gangsta life and the struggle for redemption. Though Murs wanted to make another Death Certificate but 9th wanted a more ATLiens vibe, what came was something in the middle. For Murs — whose name may or may not be an acronym for "Making Underground Raw Shit” or "Most Underground Rap Sucks” — and 9th Wonder, success is the best revenge ever, and that should come with this Revenge.

What made you want to write from other people’s experiences and perspectives on this album rather than your own? I think subconsciously it was listening to Curtis Mayfield and Johnny Cash. Mayfield was never a drug dealer but he made "Pusherman,” and it’s a hot song. Marvin Gaye was an alcoholic and violent tempered, and when you listen to his music it’s all about peace and God. So it was just me learning and being inspired by others, seeing them step up out of themselves and tell stories that needed to be told.

The only cussing on the album is Big Pooh on "Barbershop” and he ends up apologising to you on the track. Where did the idea of clean language come from? My mom had asked me to do it. I’d always wanted to do it because I’m a big Will Smith fan and I figure if he could do it, I could do it, and no one else is doing it so I’ll take it upon myself.

What’s it like being on a new label? It’s kind of weird, ’cause I was never technically on Def Jux — I had no contracts or obligations. I really don’t like being obligated to one label or one place; I’m more like a gypsy at heart. (Record Collection)