Motörhead / Corrosion of Conformity The Docks, Toronto ON - April 25, 2005

Motörhead / Corrosion of Conformity The Docks, Toronto ON - April 25, 2005
"We are Motörhead," Lemmy Kilmister said through a puff of cigarette smoke as his band swaggered onto the Docks' stage to the chants and cheers of a ready crowd. "And we play rock and roll," as if, 30 years into their deafening run, there could be any doubt about either. Even set against the aural blitz of openers Corrosion of Conformity, with charismatic front-man Pepper Keenan and bassist Mike Dean (the Jaco Pastorius of drop-tuned Southern heavy metal) in fine form, Motörhead's rock'n'roll remains faster and louder than seems possible from a band entering their fourth decade. Grizzled Lemmy, clowning drummer Mikkey Dee and half-bored guitarist Phil Campbell fired through a set of crowd-pleasers judiciously selected from the band's extensive catalogue of nearly identical blues-based thrash tempo songs, drawing heavily on the material from their late '70s/early '80s peak. "Stay Clean" was every bit as filthy here as on their 1981 live masterpiece No Sleep 'til Hammersmith; the comparatively slow groove of "Metropolis" offered relief from the grind of "No Class," "Over the Top" and - but of course - "Ace of Spades." Not that breakneck nostalgia was the only thing on offer: "In the Name of Tragedy" from 2004's Inferno was easily the sharpest performance of the night. "Here's a sad song," Lemmy said, keeping with the theme of tragedy as he readjusted his Rickenbacker before "Ramones" ("Fuzz tone, hear 'em go/hear 'em on the radio"). "It used to be a happy song, but everyone I wrote it for is fucking dead." After a barebones acoustic "Whorehouse Blues," Pepper Keenan joined Motörhead on stage for a final "Overkill." "Don't forget us, Toronto," Lemmy growled at the end of a long night. "We are Motörhead, and we play rock and fucking roll."