Misery Index Discordia

Misery Index Discordia
Baltimore’s Misery Index have made the switch from Nuclear Blast to Relapse for Discordia, and it makes sense. Considering the grind and crust punk sounds and influences this band have, it’s just more fitting. And with this new release, this always-scattered band seem to have finally found their footing. While their last album, Retaliate, was certainly solid, it doesn’t have the cohesiveness that this one has. Through all the member changes and the smaller releases (splits, EPs), Misery Index have finally progressed past the ex-Dying Fetus tag and indeed have surpassed the band they spawned from. Although Discordia continues this band’s tradition of having a strangely over-produced sound, it is better than before, and much better than Dying Fetus. Still, it sounds really silly when a drummer using triggers on his snare and then tries to do a snare roll that gets progressively louder. Clicking and clacking aside, the drumming kicks ass, and this album smokes: be it through the Slayer-ish plodding of the title track, the endless amount of great riffs, the political lyrics, or the relentless and groove-filled grind found in songs like the one-two punch of "Conquistadores” or "Outsourcing Jehova” — it’s the sound of a very confident band who know who they are, and know what they want.

You’ve had some bad luck with line-up changes, labels, etc. Do you feel like your time has finally come? Guitarist Sparky Voyles: Growing up around Washington, DC, I have always been aware of politicians putting a spin on a negative situation to turn it positive. So, on that front, and to practice for my future political career, let’s say that the line-up changes and label switch were blessings in disguise.

Does this bad luck influence how the music sounds? There are plenty of real-life daily situations that can provide tons of negative inspiration without having to look at the misfortunes within the band. Say, when I look out the window here in downtown Baltimore and see a metre reader leaving a ticket on my windshield.

What’s going on lyrically on Discordia? Jason [Netherton, bassist/vocalist] typically writes about real life situations, historical events, and the human condition. The lyrics aren’t meant to be preachy; rather, more hopeful, and not the clichéd "the world is fucked up and fuck everything” style of writing. If you want to check them out, cool; if not, just rock out to the tunes. (Relapse)