Megadeth Thirteen

Megadeth Thirteen
I've said it before and it holds true with this latest from thrash lifers Megadeth: every album they put out in this late, return-to-form phase in their career makes us raise the horns and bang our heads at first, but give us three months and we're scrambling to the internet to remember what the damn albums were called. Thirteen continues this tradition, but it deserves so much more ― the first album with classic-era line-up bassist Dave Ellefson since 2001's ill-fated The World Needs a Hero contains all the classic Megadeth song structures, raging soloing, memorable songs and great production that make any 'deth album that doesn't suck great. And Thirteen is great, from the short and simple metal rockers like "Wrecker," which brings to mind the fun parts of Youthanasia and Cryptic Writings (yes, there were fun parts) to the riff-happy thrash majesty of "Never Dead" and "Sudden Death." But by the slow trudge of "Millennium of the Blind," the listener is starting to get beaten down ― this one definitely goes on for a few songs too long. Luckily, Dave Mustaine's vocal sneer is a bit tamer, which helps tone down the relentless antagonism that often taints their output. As an aside, this being released on the same day as Metallica's latest atrocity, and clearly coming out victorious, might help heal some of Mustaine's obvious, public and very deep wounds regarding his ex-bandmates and his never-ending quest to rise above number two status. Well, Mustaine, stop beating yourself up so much, you've done it. (Roadrunner)