A Life Once Lost Hunter

A Life Once Lost Hunter
Abruptly shifting styles and labels with every release can permanently stifle a lesser band’s success, but A Life Once Lost won’t be put down that easily. While reigning in the rhythmically chaotic Meshuggah worship of 2003’s A Great Artist, the group have undeniably taken a massive step forward as far as songwriting is concerned. Drawing from an even more dizzying plethora of influences this time around, shades of Pantera, Zao, Coalesce, Entombed and Blood Has Been Shed are present, but not overpowering. The songs more often than not have repetitious, and as a result, infectious hooks and choruses; every second is teeming with sly, sinister groove. Vocalist Robert Meadows still draws comparisons to Meshuggah’s Jens Kidman, with his throaty, controlled delivery a little more soulful and less mechanised than on previous outings. Their first release for metalcore giants Ferret, Hunter sees ALOL developing their sound on their own terms, and resisting any particular trend or hindrance to their musical evolution. Yet another cat in the bag for the label and a firm statement of intent in a near stagnant genre.

The new disc has a bit of a catchy, immediate feel, while still retaining aspects of the last record's sound. Was this deliberate, and what are your general thoughts on the writing process for Hunter?< /b> Meadows: That is what we wanted to do with this record. We wanted it to fester inside your head when you were sleeping and while you are doing your homework. The music itself is a step beyond what we created with A Great Artist. The writing process was very long. We were jamming five days a week for hours and hours a day. During this time you question the importance of taking this record so seriously. I am pretty sure if we knew the end result of all this work, we would not have changed anything.

What are your thoughts on the lyrics, and the general concept of the disc? The record dips into the internal struggle in finding happiness in sanity, security and safety, with the lyrics strongly being influences by relationships that I have or created over the years — relationships with friends, family, the band, the scene and loved ones. (Ferret)