Klaxons’ No Rave Scene

Klaxons’ No Rave Scene
Forget what you’ve heard or read about Klaxons because chances are it wasn’t accurate. This "new rave” business that the British press have smeared on any band with a danceable rhythm section does not apply here. "We’re not a rave band and we’re not trying to be perceived as a rave band,” confesses irked guitarist/vocalist Simon Taylor. "We’re a pop band playing pop songs. People show up with glow sticks and whistles dressed in neon expecting to rave, but we’re not playing to that.”

Ever since the band and a friend jokingly coined the term as a foolish sub-genre that had yet to exist, it’s managed to follow them around like an evil curse. "We did invent it but it didn’t have anything to do with us. It doesn’t have any synergy with what the three of us do.”

What the three of them have done is reach an entire new generation in the UK with their frenetic gigs and arguably the year’s most rousing debut full-length in Myths of the Near Future. Clearly lacking rave’s distinguishing features (unless you count one blaring siren on "Atlantis to Interzone”), instead the album is simply a perfectly constructed head-trip. "The idea was to not use electronics, but replicate them organically with the bass and guitar and with a keyboard. It wasn’t to use beats, because it’s not really a dance record. You can probably shimmy to it a little.”

But raving is another story. It’s come to a point where Taylor’s asking a journalist for advice on how to cope. "I think we should just succumb to it,” he admits, half joking, half defeated. "Perhaps we should start dressing in neon and tracksuit bottoms, blowing whistles with sly faces. We did a photo shoot once wearing some funny capes and then everyone said it was this ‘new rave’ thing, which has stuck like shit! It’s funny how nothing else has stuck.”