Kill Your Idols

Kill Your Idols
This documentary examining the advent of free music and no wave in New York and its influence on today’s mushrooming scene is certainly of interest to any fans of DNA, right down to Black Dice. Through a series of interviews with the main players and some great vintage performance clips, the film does a nice job establishing a story. Innovators like Arto Lindsay, Thurston Moore and Martin Rev reminisce, while Lydia Lunch gets the most in-depth, spitting passion when admitting it all began "because they had no other choice. It was a sickness within themselves that they had to try and purge through music.” From there it jumps to 2002, when the new wave of no wave and post-punk appeared. Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Liars, A.R.E. Weapons and Black Dice all share their stories, which segues nicely into some nasty mudslinging by the originators. The bitter first generation claims the new breed are manufactured and spoiled little suburban brats, lacking intellect and simply looking for fame. It’s fun to watch, but this doesn’t help the fact that the film is compiled with the same disorder that fuels such music. Little is said about what happened between the years of 1982 and 2002, and the filmmaker doesn’t explore why this trend picked up 20 years later. Regardless of its flaws, this is still a great look at some of the past’s greatest innovators and today’s hottest followers. (Palm)