Julie Doiron Goodnight Nobody

Julie Doiron Goodnight Nobody
People tend to mention the phrase "close listening” in relation to Julie Doiron, and while it may mean "turn it up!” to some, it is actually a very noteworthy compliment; things that seem derivative or false are dismissed quickly since the surface pretty much covers everything. Ms. Doiron so ably brings out an intangible realness that, with every raw strum and vocal trill, draws people closer to her and makes them want to comfort, cajole and chatter with her. Goodnight Nobody will no doubt compound such fascination as it includes her most fleshed-out songs and ideas since the Wooden Stars days, with much thanks going to Julie aficionados/backing band, Herman Dune from Paris. Instead of instruments being mere dressing, like on Desormais, the songs, most notably "The Songwriter,” bring Julie closer to contemporaries like Cat Power, who Julie comes scarily close to on some tracks. This embrace of indie rock emboldens songs like "Good Night” and adds an incredible depth to opener "Snow Falls in November.” There is much obsession with night on this album, with no less than four songs, plus the album title, mentioning it, but Doiron is nowhere near the end of her day in the music world. In fact, a new day is opening up, with more people everyday closely listening, or even better, hoping to experience the emotions that Julie so enticingly exudes.

Everything seems bolder and bigger, but yet still intimate. Was this is a conscious decision? I was finally ready to make a bigger record. Heart & Crime had to be made as it was, specifically because it was the next English record following Julie Doiron and the Wooden Stars. For this one, enough time had gone by without having worked with a band that I can make that kind of record with, one that’s more open, confident, bigger and warmer.

What was the inspiration to make "Sorry Part III”? It so happened that my son walked into the room and dinner time can be hectic sometimes because people have to be in their pajamas, etc. I just sort of lost it for no reason and I felt really terrible afterward. The song poured at the moment shortly after everyone went to bed. I thought it would be funny to call it "Sorry Part III,” because it’s so extreme. Three of them?

Looking over your albums, except for Desormais, there’s at least one song with the word "dance” in it. What does dancing represent to you? I think in terms of dancing, it’s something that I love to do but never go out and do it. So maybe there’s a secret desire that pops up all the time, I love to dance and I do it in the house, all the time, with my kids. I guess because I had my children so young in life I’ve never had a phase in my life where I went out dancing all the time. Maybe I missed out on dancing, but I still really love to dance. (Endearing)