John Lydon Is Trying to Rep Ireland for 2018's Eurovision Song Contest

The punk vet says "it would be a great honour" to have his song chosen
John Lydon Is Trying to Rep Ireland for 2018's Eurovision Song Contest
Plenty of Sex Pistols listeners were quick to slag the band's ex-frontman John Lydon (a.k.a. Johnny Rotten) for some commentary on Brexit and Donald Trump earlier this year, but he'll now be looking to win the admiration of his home country Ireland with an entry into the Eurovision Song Contest.

The Irish Sun reports that Lydon has teamed with songwriter Niall Mooney to write a "country-punk" tune titled "Pleased to Meet You" for entry into the competition. Lydon's manager John Rambo Stevens confirmed to the publication that the punk vet will perform the tune with Public Image Limited should the entry be accepted.

"[Raidió Teilifís Éireann] told us to find singers who are used to playing to big crowds, a catchy song and, most of all, something unexpected which has never been done before at Eurovision," Mooney told the Sun. "I wrote to Johnny's management, describing the idea of Johnny representing Ireland in Eurovision. They came back to me saying, 'You may be surprised but we totally get this.'"

On Twitter, Mooney noted Lydon would be the perfect candidate as the "son of Irish parents living in London during the height of the troubles – I couldn't think of a more relevant entrant to send from Ireland considering where the world is now."

Lydon himself told the Sun that "it would be a great honour for me to represent Ireland for the Eurovision Song contest."

Whether broadcaster Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTE) will accept the track still remains to be seen, but the Sun reports that those involved have been having "sleepless nights" over the possibility of Lydon stepping to the microphone.

The Eurovision Song Contest, which stands as the longest-running annual international TV song competition, will hold its 2018 edition from May 8 to 12 in Lisbon, Portugal. Ireland's selection will be revealed after Christmas.