I Hate Sally Don't Worry Lady

I Hate Sally Don't Worry Lady
Photo: Jess Baumung
Like I Hate Sally’s earlier recordings, Don’t Worry Lady combines metal, punk and hardcore in a thick, crushing, melodic sludge of visceral intensity. But the band’s latest album, their first for Underground Operations, doesn’t rush forward in eager and fearless enthusiasm; instead it weaves its way onward with a wiser reflectiveness, almost tentative despite its brutality. The monumental weight of the record — its wandering, slightly restrained, heaviness, its refusal to stay locked in place, its steamroller ferocity and Dee Prescott’s throat-wrenching vocal blasphemies — makes the choice of Nick Zampiello for mastering (known for his work with bands like Isis) a stroke of near brilliance, something IHS owe to the man at the mixer, Converge’s Kurt Ballou. The end result is a more sophisticated weapon, undeniably forged in metal (even if, as Prescott points out, they did axe the duelling guitar leads), but this beast has many faces. Don’t Worry Lady unloads its secrets gradually, never laying it all down in one go around.

How would you describe the difference between Don’t Worry Lady and your other albums? Prescott: Overall, I think this record has a lot more thought to it — before it was kind of like let’s record some songs — but this one was like, "Let’s record a record!” Musically it’s mega powerful; it’s matured and refined. Dropping down to one guitarist was probably our best move; it allowed Marc [Garniss, guitar] and Dan [Vokey, bass] to really show off their writing skills, and focus on what they wanted to be doing themselves. Dan had taken on a lot more writing responsibilities in the last year or so and would come up with these quirky riffs, and Marc would come up with amazing ways to fit them all together. I think it sounds more raw — stripped down — almost dirty rock.

What was going through your minds while you were songwriting? You ever get so cloudy and fogged you have no idea what’s going on? And then it’s done and you are like, "Wow, I’m glad it all worked out.” Lyrically I kind of went back to when I was younger and how I saw the world around me, then to present day, and why it doesn’t make sense yet. It’s kinda like a free for all, like yeah some shit sucks, but let’s just forget about it and move on ’cause it’s not going to get any better. (Underground Operations)