High Waisted's 'Sick of Saying Sorry' Is an Unabashed Look at Adulthood

High Waisted's 'Sick of Saying Sorry' Is an Unabashed Look at Adulthood
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Hailing from Brooklyn, High Waisted's sophomore album Sick of Saying Sorry is a sultry yet funky take on internal conflicts. "When you fight against yourself / There is no winner," proclaims vocalist Jessica Louise Dye in "Burdens," followed by an effervescent trumpet.

Four years on from debut LP On Ludlow, Sick of Saying Sorry carries on that album's playful indie garage rock with feminist undertones, while also revealing deeper emotional depth in songwriting. On "Cereal," Dye copes with what life throws at her while belting out in the chorus that it "never gets easier for me." These melancholy lyrics, masked with groovy melodies and raunchy bass lines, make for a cathartic album to dance along to in your bedroom.

High Waisted shares insight into conflicting emotions of distress disguised as optimism, revealing what happens once the party ends, the lights turn on and everyone gets kicked out. This is music for when you feel dejected and need a pep talk to lift your spirits.

With '60s surf vibes combined with Dye's raw and unabashed portrayal of adulthood — complete with adult acne and unhealthy romantic interests — Sick of Saying Sorry is a quirky listen. (Independent)