Hank Williams III Lovesick, Broke & Driftin'

Hank Williams III Lovesick, Broke & Driftin'
As the man carrying the largest legacy in country music, it wasn't surprising that Hank III's debut, Rising Outlaw, failed to live up to expectations. While it contained a ton of expected rebel attitude, its varied mix of traditional country and punk seemed more like oil and water rather than blended whiskey. Subsequent turmoil with his label and personal life resulted in an extended layoff, but all the struggles have clearly paid off with this album. LB&D is a solid collection from beginning to end, relying more on the traditional aspects of his granddaddy's style, while displaying some fine shit-kicking wordplay. The biggest influence on the album seems to be slide guitarist Kayton Roberts, best known for his work with Hank Snow, and each cut on which he appears crackles with a classic Nashville twang. However, Williams gets plenty of mileage out of knocking the establishment ("Trashville"), as well as extolling the virtues of his non-musical hobbies ("Whiskey, Weed & Women"). And hey, any album with an appearance by ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons is worth a listen. The only letdown is a rerun of "Atlantic City," which was first heard on the Nebraska tribute album, and here sticks out like a sore thumb. But anyone who doubted Hank III's abilities needs only to hear Lovesick, Broke & Driftin' to realise the legacy is in safe hands. (Curb)