Glastonbury Day 3 featuring the Drums, Julian Casablancas, Holy Fuck, Frightened Rabbit Worthy Farm, Pilton UK June 27

Glastonbury Day 3 featuring the Drums, Julian Casablancas, Holy Fuck, Frightened Rabbit Worthy Farm, Pilton UK June 27
Singed punters hoped for a surprise Sunday set from a reformed New York band, though sun strokes were ultimately more prevalent than, um, Venison. Nevertheless, scotch emo folk, Canuck blip heroics and a masterpiece from an emerging four-piece rounded out a solid final day.

To get to Glastonbury, mostly bearded Scottish four-piece Frightened Rabbit ran afoul of two vans and endured a couple days of heavy driving. Regardless, they looked spry as they played a taster plate of old and new folk-indebted rock, including a harrowing and particularly appropriate rendition of "Keep Yourself Warm."

Across the site, spastic Toronto team Holy Fuck didn't have to contend with car trouble but did have to battle a soccer match for fans. While many festivalgoers gathered under video screens for an ill-fated England versus Germany match, Holy Fuck delivered a scintillating selection of film-stock-influenced, epic electro to a faithful few.

Conversely, post-match and prior to Julian Casablancas's scheduled gig, scores of festival goers and press swarmed the John Peel tent, many whispering about an all but certain appearance from the Strokes. Coming off a recent London show — under the pseudonym, Venison — and gearing up for a slate of concerts, the band seemed good contenders for an unannounced appearance.

Instead, Casablancas and his regular touring band arrived, played a brisk, buoyant set of solo material and ironically cloying Strokes classics, and shuffled off, no Fab or Albert in sight. Nevertheless, the day's finest show came from a New York combo after all.
Neo-new wave New Yorkers the Drums have enjoyed full-on press fellatio from the UK press and their Glasto slot was a coming-out party of sorts. Polished and primed, the combo came out swinging with a set of sunny songs about dead best friends, breakups, and surfing.

Throughout, singer Jonathan Pierce — a hyperactive hybrid of Ian Curtis and David Byrne — bounced across the stage theatrically, punctuating every comment and crescendo with a flourish and a bow while his deft band jittered along accordingly. Wholly captivating, it was the set of the day.