Genghis Tron Change Their Ways

Genghis Tron Change Their Ways
"We got tired of Genghis Tron songs being interesting because of the methods involved," says Hamilton Jordan, guitarist and half of the programming team of this Poughkeepsie, New York outfit. First demonstrated by 2005's Cloak of Love EP, their "methods” involve some of the most vicious drum and bass programming (co-handled by keyboardist Michael Sochynsky) this side of Agoraphobic Nosebleed, along with vocalist and keyboardist Mookie Singerman's trachea-tearing screams and peculiar melodic diversions. With Board Up the House, the band's follow-up to their 2006 debut full-length, Dead Mountain Mouth, they're expanding those methods, and breaking apart the electronic grind sound they helped to define.

"We didn't sit down and write out a manifesto, but as we started writing, we were surprised by how — I don't want to say straightforward, but I think the more we write, the harder it is for us to impress ourselves,” Hamilton says. "As we got into doing demos for this album, we felt ourselves being more challenged and more pleased by trying to write songs that were, in some ways, a little more repetitive, and felt more song-oriented.” The result still carries the band's trademark mix of brutal grind passages and melodic electronic breaks, but with more care paid to crafting those disparate elements into cohesive pieces of music.

"We could write another Cloak of Love in a week, and it would probably be better than the last one. But we’re not interested, because that’s not challenging to us anymore,” Hamilton says. "I hold technical metal bands in the same reverence as bands who can take the same three chords and make it sound new again. We’re just trying to explore realms of songwriting that are foreign to us. That said, there certainly aren’t any three-chord songs on the album.”