Franz Ferdinand Get The Girls

Franz Ferdinand Get The Girls
Dancing has always played a significant part in shaping rock'n'roll's wild side, but to Franz Ferdinand, it's more than that. It's the reason they exist. The Glaswegian quartet formed back in 2001, simply as a device to get girls. To dance, that is.

Initially, it all began as a reaction against what they were witnessing at their local gigs. "In Glasgow, when you go out to see bands, there are a lot of males," explains bassist Bob Hardy. "They're into music like post-rock and other types of music without any rhythm. Most of them just stand around stroking their chins. It never looks like they're having any fun. There never seemed to be any girls at the shows. We wanted to do something to get them out dancing."

Their first gig was at an art exhibition in a girl's bedroom. Organisers heard about the band's plan and the debut turned out to be a success where "at least 80 people watched and most of them danced." Their plan, executed via a good, propulsive disco beat, worked not only with the girls, but also with the general public. Since the January release of their second single, "Take Me Out," all of Britain seems to have caught on, sending the band to the top of the charts. Their eponymous debut album is a catchy, riff-driven disco, rich in sophisticated posture and sure to keep listeners dancing the way Scottish heroes Josef K and Orange Juice did two decades ago.

But Hardy is quick to point out that Franz Ferdinand is no longer a band just for girls. "We want to do it for everybody really. For males, old people and little tots. In fact, I hear we're quite popular with the kids, which is brilliant."