Fantômas Delìrium Còrdia

Fantômas Delìrium Còrdia
Mike Patton is at it again. The master of the unexpected, bizarre and often utterly brilliant has offered up an hour-long soundtrack to the body’s last gasps as the heart sputters to its final stop, or merely delivered something to put on as background music during Halloween. Your choice. He’s also thrown fans another violent curve, this time stripping down Fantômas’ jump-cut, hyperactive, frantic style of metallic rampaging to its most minimal while expanding on the disturbing, eerie, horror-like atmospherics of past works. It’s like Disco Volante or Director’s Cut but without the "songs” or "structure.” Still, Patton is here to challenge and while it’s not his most difficult listen it may be his most disturbing. Bouts of random noise and glimpses of Fantômas’ sonic attack dot an hour-plus, one-track atmospheric soundscape that at times is as peaceful and beautiful as Vangelis’s Bladerunner score, at other times features a wind machine, bells, chimes, chanting and screeches. You know, the atmospheric horror movie preamble before the killing begins. It’s easy to say Patton has done it again, but harder to figure out what exactly it is: another brilliant assault on the blasé music establishment or one of his occasional missteps?

How challenging was creating an album this restrained? Patton: The challenge was writing sparse music that was interesting and not a snooze, especially given the fact that Fantômas’ basic language is to play fast as you can for very short bits at a time. To try to do something else was not only a challenge but really fun. I just wasn’t sure if it would translate and work because it goes against a lot of my instincts as a writer.

You’ve said you "want to give people something to think about.” What do you want people to think about with Delìrium Còrdia? I don’t give a shit. I put it out there, it’s up to them to make sense of it and to enjoy it or not listen. Telling them what to think would be overstepping my boundaries. I want them to think for themselves, put out a problem and have them solve it or not. There’s too much stuff treating the public like morons. I give them a little more credit.

Do people read too much into your music-making motives? It’s more romantic to think that. It puts a purpose behind something you don’t understand. I don’t mind the personality angle. What a fucking bastard I am. If that helps this music make sense, fine. You’re wrong, but go ahead and think that. (Ipecac)