An Essential Guide to Ennio Morricone

An Essential Guide to Ennio Morricone
What to Avoid:

With a catalogue so vast, it goes without saying that not all Morricone records are created equal. While it's hard to write off any as straight-up "bad," there are many out there that do feel uninspired, to say the least. Unfortunately, these are often also the ones most easy found in the discount bin — Moses, Marco Polo, Rampage, Bloodline — and for good reason. Also, while The Mission may be seen as a high point for many (after all it did win several awards back in 1986), it's really not the most exciting Morricone release, especially if you're just starting to test those waters. Oh, and be wary of this insult of a compilation, which doesn't contain the Morricone originals but a series of horrible muzak reinterpretations.



Where to Go from Here:

With the vinyl reissue market booming right now, it's a golden age to be into Morricone, as a new reissue seems to pop up monthly. But you'd also be wise to explore the work of his main collaborators: Bruno Nicolai and Alessandro Alessandroni, both of whom have also been treated to various reissues in recently, mainly via crate-digging UK label Finders Keepers. We also highly recommend exploring Alessandroni's psych-leaning projects Braen Machine and Braen Raskovich, with both reissued recently as well. And if you're up to it, you can dive into the free jazz insanity that is Gruppo D'Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza, who boasted Morricone as a member.