Editors The Back Room

Editors The Back Room
Like several bands of the past 26 years, Editors cull the vernal, yet dyspeptic, pastures of Joy Division, but have a more eager willingness towards popular song structures — translating into popular success, at least in the UK. Upon the release of their first single, "Munich,” in January of 2005, the band were dubbed "Boy Division” and jeers of "cheer up” could be heard at their concerts. More than one year, a supporting tour with Franz Ferdinand, and a platinum album later Editors present The Back Room to non-import purchasing North American audiences. Yes it sounds jarringly familiar, but it also sounds accomplished and catching — especially when you consider that this is their first album. With "Munich,” "Bullets,” "All Sparks” and "Blood,” Editors offer four disconcertingly taut and consistent singles. True, Tom Smith’s vocals oscillate between Chris Martin and Jeff Martin (the Tea Party) arriving at a medium of Paul Banks (Interpol), but it sounds good, and unlike the Killers, you won’t feel guilty about liking it.

Your first single was released in the UK over a year ago. Have you started writing for the second album already? Singer/guitarist Tom Smith: On tour we’re playing three new songs, and we have about six new songs in total. The new stuff’s quite pretty and it’s very heart-on-its-sleeve compared to the first record. We don’t have any set mission, except that we don’t want it to be shit. Hopefully the release of the second record will coincide with the release of the first one in America. It is strange to think that when we come over to America the first record’s not even out there.

I understand your guitarist Chris Urbanowicz has had some health problems… Chris started off the year with an eye infection which crossed into both eyes, then in America he started coughing up blood and bits of skin from the inside of his mouth. Then he got an infection on his finger from playing the guitar too hard — so his nail fell off — and then he got an ulcer where his wisdom teeth were coming through.

After your success in Europe, how important is success in North America to you? You owe it to yourself to see how far you can take it. I do think we have things in common with the bands that Americans have taken to, like the Cure or Depeche Mode. And I’ve always thought there were some big songs on the album. We’re not some dark indie band for people to sit in their rooms and listen to because they’re afraid of sunlight. (Sony BMG)