Frozen Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee

Frozen Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee

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In the spirit of winter miracles, Disney's latest fairy tale adventure Frozen is easily their greatest effort in the genre since Beauty and the Beast. Loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's "The Snow Queen," Frozen tells the story of two princesses and their individual journeys to accept themselves for who they are. This might sound rather heavy for an animated film with a talking snowman, but directors Chris Buck (Surf's Up) and first-timer Jennifer Lee have carefully crafted this tale into a delight for all ages.

Once close sisters, Anna (Kristen Bell) and Elsa (Idina Menzel) have been estranged for years, yet still live within the same castle walls. After years of seclusion, they reopen the castle doors to the public and it becomes clear what their upbringing has done to them: Elsa believes that she needs to hide what makes her special from the world, while Anna, eager to connect, throws herself at the first charming prince that comes along. Then, there's this whole fiasco that finds their little village entirely frozen over in the middle of summer.

Contrary to what the title suggests, Frozen has an incredibly warm feel to it. Amidst endless drifts of snow, there are gorgeous, glowing lanterns to shine a light on this unique tale and all of its endearing characters, including the aforementioned snowman (voiced by Josh Gad) that wants nothing more than to know what it feels like to bask in the sun. Perhaps most importantly, Frozen leaves its strongest mark by allowing its princesses to be their own knights in shining armour, recognizing that true love doesn't always have to ride in on a horse to save the day with a kiss. (Walt Disney)