Die Tödliche Doris Sprechpause

Die Tödliche Doris Sprechpause
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Challenging the notion of what it was to be a musical group since their inception in 1980s West Berlin, Die Tödliche Doris constantly evolved stylistically, shifting their methodology, their sound and even the format of their releases. Hovering in a space consistent only in its inconsistency, the collective — fronted by author and artist Wolfgang Müller — fused postmodern philosophy with post-punk grit. The group's debut, the ingeniously titled "___", featured 13 tracks, each completely different in content and execution. The album's closing "song" — and certainly the most opaque of the bunch — was "In Der Pause," a heady blend of drum machines and garbled radio broadcasts.
 
Now, 35 years after the release of "___", Müller and bandmate Chris Dreier found the source material from "In der Pause" on a single audio tape dating back to 1981. The duo used the sounds as the basis for five new pieces of "pause music," imaginary interludes for non-existent broadcasts.
 
Augmented by analogue electronics, software and modern-day radio and television broadcasts, the tracks are as disparate as they are intriguing. "Sendepause" is a cantankerous web of static, while the thick drones of "Ratenpause" are deep and disturbing. "Acht-Jahres-Pause" and "Schweigeminute" bear the closest resemblance to their parent composition, each borrowing a unique element from the source material. The final piece, entitled "Pausenmusik," is an ear-splitting blast of noise and shredded radio static that introduces a new guise of "Deadly Doris" decades after the world thought she'd disappeared. (Fang Bomb)