Copyright Board of Canada Instates New Tariffs for Playing Recorded Music at Weddings, Public Events

Copyright Board of Canada Instates New Tariffs for Playing Recorded Music at Weddings, Public Events
In what appears to be the music industry's latest attempt to recoup its losses associated with illegal downloading, the Copyright Board of Canada has instated new tariffs for using recorded music during a series of public events, including at karaoke bars, conventions, fairs, parades and, believe it or not, weddings.

The CBC reports that the fees will be collected by a not-for-profit organization called Re:Sound, which will be similar in purpose to the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN), except that it will focus on labels and performers rather than songwriters and publishers.

So exactly how much will it cost to pipe out live music at an event? For weddings, receptions, fashion shows and other similar gatherings, it will cost between $9.25 and $39.33 per day, depending on how many people are there. Karaoke bars will pay an annual fee somewhere between $86.06 and $124, based on how frequent their music nights are. And parades with be forced to pay $4.39 per float with a minimum fee of $32.55 per day.

Re:Sound will work on the honour system, with business owners and event organizers being required to report their music usage. There will be a number of licensing professionals around the country to ensure that everyone is playing by the rules.

Read more about the nitty-gritty of the laws here.