Check Out Reviews of Dead Man's Bones, A Place to Bury Strangers, Harmonia and More in New Release Tuesday

Check Out Reviews of Dead Man's Bones, A Place to Bury Strangers, Harmonia and More in New Release Tuesday
It's feeling more and more like autumn, the time when new releases fall like multi-coloured leaves from trees. And so this Tuesday, there are more than a few noteworthy releases worth checking out in Exclaim!'s Recently Reviewed section.

First up is the self-titled debut album from Dead Man's Bones, the musical project headed by actors Ryan Gosling and Zach Shields. It's a macabre, lo-fi full-length, taking cues from the Langley School Music Project by enlisting a children's choir to make some hauntingly touching chamber pop.

Seeing it's long-awaited re-release is the classic Krautrock/ambient/electronic album from Harmonia & Eno '76, Tracks and Traces. It hasn't been on shelves for years, and the bonus material makes this one well-worth the wait. Also being reissued this week is the long-obscure Sound System International Dub, an album recorded by King Tubby & the Clancy Eccles All Stars nearly 35 years ago that sounds exhilarating and fresh even by today's dub standards.

New Yorkers A Place to Bury Strangers return this week with their sophomore album, Exploding Head, which proudly showcases lead vocalist and guitarist Oliver Ackermann's technical prowess, both with his instrument and in the studio. And indie legend Lou Barlow is back, this time with emotive, home-recorded solo effort Goodnight Unkown.

Anvil's This Is Thirteen, the audio pseudo-counterpart to the recent documentary Anvil! The Story of Anvil, was released this week as well, to remind listeners of why the band became beloved in the first place. And, finally, eclectic Saskatchewan-born singer-songwriter Mocky releases Saskamodie this week, his fourth and perhaps most accomplished album yet.

As always, check out our Recently Reviewed section for the freshest album reviews.