Canada Extends Copyright Terms to 70 Years

Canada Extends Copyright Terms to 70 Years
The Canadian Copyright Act has always offered 50 years of protection to artists, meaning artists like Buffy Sainte-Marie, Neil Young and Joni Mitchell could have seen their 1965 work become public domain for the next five years. Fortunately for them (and less fortunate for those looking to sell unlicensed cover versions of these songs), the protection has been expanded.

The decision to raise the copyright period was initially brought up in the Conservatives' Economic Action Plan earlier this year, and has now been written into law.

"I'm still releasing albums but my fans love my older songs," Gordon Lightfoot said in a statement to Music Canada. "Thanks to the federal government for the recent legislation. Its passage will make sure the sun doesn't go down on my early songs."

Graham Henderson, president of Music Canada, added, "In extending the term of copyright in recorded music, Prime Minister Harper and the Government of Canada have demonstrated a real understanding of music's importance to the Canadian economy. Thank you. We are thrilled to see Canada brought in line with the international standard of 70 years."