The Bakerton Group El Rojo

Started as a means for metallic rock band Clutch to explore their bluesy side, the Bakerton Group remain vocal-less, with Clutch throat Neil Fallon relegaStarted as a means for metallic rock band Clutch to explore their bluesy side, the Bakerton Group remain vocal-less, with Clutch throat Neil Fallon relegated to rhythm guitar. El Rojo is the outfit's third release since 2000 and their sophomore full-length. Primarily, it resembles Clutch without Fallon's unparalleled rock raps but under the surface are jam-format templates that allow the compositions to stretch out into jazzier plains. Succinct cuts such as "M.(F).H.S" and "Time Horizon" rein in expected Clutch comparisons and "The Gigantomakhia" could be an outtake from Clutch's 1999 effort, Jam Room. Opeth keyboardist Per Wiberg guests on the album and tracks like "Chancellor" and the unabashedly psychedelic "Work 'Em" take on new textural significance with the addition of warm organ tones. NYC-based saxophonist Raven augments "Bien Clásico" and "Bill Proger's Galaxy," affixing a distinct King Crimson-like layer to the proceedings. El Rojo is the band's most fluid moment, and though it doesn't feature vocals, almost every tune would lend itself to a few well-placed rhymes from Fallon.ted to rhythm guitar. El Rojo is the outfit's third release since 2000 and their sophomore full-length. Primarily, it resembles Clutch without Fallon's unparalleled rock raps but under the surface are jam-format templates that allow the compositions to stretch out into jazzier plains. Succinct cuts such as "M.(F).H.S" and "Time Horizon" rein in expected Clutch comparisons and "The Gigantomakhia" could be an outtake from Clutch's 1999 effort, Jam Room. Opeth keyboardist Per Wiberg guests on the album and tracks like "Chancellor" and the unabashedly psychedelic "Work 'Em" take on new textural significance with the addition of warm organ tones. NYC-based saxophonist Raven augments "Bien Clásico" and "Bill Proger's Galaxy," affixing a distinct King Crimson-like layer to the proceedings. El Rojo is the band's most fluid moment, and though it doesn't feature vocals, almost every tune would lend itself to a few well-placed rhymes from Fallon. (Weathermaker)