Arsis A Diamond for Disease

Arsis A Diamond for Disease
After being approached by NYC’s Ballet Deviare, Arsis mastermind James Malone accepted their invitation to compose a score for an upcoming performance, conjuring a nearly 13-minute epic that goes above and beyond expectations produced by their highly acclaimed 2004 debut A Celebration of Guilt. The result cements he and drum partner Micheal Van Dyne’s status as one of the most talented metal bands to emerge in years. Giving a heavy nod to Carcass’ Heartwork and the mighty melodicisms of At the Gates’ Slaughter of the Soul, the classic and triumphant elements of these precursors shine through the songs with a unique technical twist. Tempo changes, light speed arpeggios, and incessant shredding are weaved into an intricately patterned musical tapestry. The song transitions move smoothly through different movements, the vitriolic sting of harsh vocals and the overwhelming presence of precise, pounding beats fashioning a particularly memorable sound. The disc is rounded out by an excellent cover of Alice Cooper’s "Roses on White Lace” and the comparatively short "Promise of Never,” proving exactly how Arsis have honed their own brand of extreme metal. Once again, Willowtip visionary Jason Tipton has delivered a gem and hopefully, with the help of Earache, he’ll be able to keep them coming.

How did writing A Diamond for Disease for Ballet Deviare affect the outcome of the song? Guitarist/Bassist/Vocalist: James Malone: Well, when the ballet approached me about composing the music for their company they asked for a fifteen-minute (or close to it) work that they could use for multiple performances. So from the start I committed myself to writing a much longer piece of music than I had ever attempted. I really wanted to help promote the company as much as possible, so I thought releasing the song with some other material as an EP would be the best way for myself to spread the word about the company.

What about the nature of this performance, if anything, did you take into account when composing? When I started writing A Diamond for Disease I asked the ballet company if they wanted me to study any ballet performances to get an idea of what ideas might work best. The company told me no. They insisted that it might sway my inspiration and that they really wanted a song that could stand on its own aside from the ballet performance. So, I just attempted to write the best metal song I that could, given the length that they wanted. (Willowtip)