Aesop Rock Fast Cars, Danger, Fire and Knives

Aesop Rock Fast Cars, Danger, Fire and Knives
Aesop Rock’s newest mini-album is a seven-song collection of dark, Definitive Jux funk that sees Ace-Rizzle playing around with his readily identifiable monotone flow. But for the most part, it’s not that far removed from his previous album, Bazooka Tooth. The beats might be layered with less noise on Fast Cars, Danger, Fire and Knives, but it’s still the same old Aesop Rock, Blockhead and El-P production. He’s also continued the trend of minimising cryptic literary references in exchange for vivid stories illustrated with New York, new millennium b-boy-isms. Still, there’s plenty of layers of symbolism to peel away, like the critique of modern society on "Food, Clothes, Medicine,” with its rather odd, sex-moan sample. On the electro-funk of "Zodiaccupuncture,” Ace occasionally gives greater emphasis to the end of each bar and rattles off words in quick succession, both giving change to his otherwise monotone flow. And when he gets down with El-P and Camutao on "Rickety Rackety,” with it’s groovy up tempo bass line, Ace speeds up his flow, resulting in the album’s funkiest track. Fast Cars, Danger, Fire and Knives is short and to the point, and leaves the listener wanting more — which can be appeased by listening to Aesop Rock’s whole back catalogue accompanied with the long-sought-after 80-page booklet of lyrics contained in the first twenty thousand copies of this CD. Can you ask for anything more?

Why include a booklet of your lyrics with Fast Cars, Danger, Fire and Knives? Unfortunately you can’t just put music out anymore. You need some sort of multimedia package or people just aren’t happy. I thought of the book; it seemed different than what a lot of other cats were doing, and a lot of fans have asked me over the years why I had never printed my lyrics with my records. It just wasn’t something I ever wanted to do.

What prompted the new, funkier sound? I have always felt that slow funk music is truly the shit that makes me want to rhyme the most. I write the best to it, and it feels good to spit over something that is really dark and has a groove to it.

What about the new flows? It’s always a necessity to want to try new flows. Plus, as I said, this kind of funk direction I am working on is helping a lot. It leaves me open to ride the beats in different ways and really get involved in the patterns I use, which can play a huge part in delivering the message. I always wanna try new shit. I want it to keep changing ’til I die. (Definitive Jux)