6SISS Prisma

6SISS Prisma
7
Prisma, the spooky new four-track EP from self-described "family man" 6SISS goes a long way in techno. For fans of E-Saggila and Muqata'a, this heavy, and heavily textured, spiky electronic release will hit the spot.
 
Reminiscent of older EBM and industrial dance music, Prisma opens strong with an already obvious warehouse dance floor anthem: the title track starts screeching, but then progresses into a tough, scratchy, techno beat. Hitting at just over eight minutes, it doesn't feel like a chore to listen to. A breakdown that comes in after five adds layers of white noise and static, and offers enough give in the beat to keep the listening experience interesting.
 
Third track "Delta" throws down a sharp, industrial, almost metal-esque dance track, with groaning drones just barely audible. It's easy to imagine this song being played in some basement, looking filthy, but easily the coolest party around. Perhaps the least sonically accessible track, "Delta" is a harsh techno track for serious dancers who are willing to let the music take them over and move without a beat.
 
6SISS himself encourages listeners: "Don't search for melodies on my tracks; see them as haunted trips." Surely, that's what they are. If they Prisma wasn't a dance record, it would be played during chase scenes in horror movies, or at one of those haunted houses where actors jump out at patrons, screaming and covered in fake blood.
 
6SISS often plays with a metalcore/drone band, and the influence of the genres can be seen on Prisma. He bends sound to his will, making even the sharpest of highs seem planned and organized. The tracks on Prisma are meticulous; most techno and house feels carefully arranged, and this is no different.
 
Final track "Zeal" is a real techno banger. Turn up the volume a bit too high and it'll bruise your eardrums. Eight-and-a-half minutes of tough drums, samples and surprise breaks closes the EP with a feeling of serious harmony. For hardcore and bedroom ravers alike, Prisma is one of those records that instantly feels real. Surely, even the most serious of techno purists will find something to enjoy about it. (R&S)