2 Turntables and a Microphone: The Life and Death of Jam Master Jay Stephan Watford and Guy Logan

2 Turntables and a Microphone: The Life and Death of Jam Master Jay Stephan Watford and Guy Logan
Unlike rappers Tupac and Biggie, DJ Jam Master Jay didn't glorify the street mentality he was born into, and so his murder at his studio in Jamaica, Queens on October 30, 2002 was shocking on a whole new level. A legend of hip-hop for his role in Run DMC as DJ and fashion consultant ― the group's whole style was cribbed from Jay ― the DJ stayed in the 'hood in which he grew up in order to help local talent and friends with his studio and label, JMJ Records. It was a noble gesture, certainly, but also possibly the death of him. At least that's what the documentary 2 Turntables and a Microphone wonders with its inquiry into his murder. Did the man who discovered Onyx and 50 Cent, who hired his friends to fill job positions, make a mistake when he made Randy Allen (an old friend, criminal and ex-crack head he owed big-time) the vice-president of his company? Jay's closest friends and family make a solid case for something fishy going on. They ask some good questions, like why none of the witnesses want to come forward, for example. While no definitive answer is given for the murder, 2 Turntables also serves as an ode to the superstar DJ, establishing Jason Mizell's status as a pioneer and legend, from his introduction to the turntable to the importance of his role in Run DMC and his evolution into a producer and label owner (JMJ Records) with the waning of his group. At times, the documentary suffers from a cheap investigative journalism style, but the subject is worthy and a high-profile interview with 50 Cent might bring in some of the young bucks that need to hear this message. (Image)