Zombie Strippers Jay Lee

Zombie Strippers Jay Lee
It only takes one quick Google search to discover that "zombie porn” exists (i.e. Re-Penetrator), which means that yes, zombies have become so ubiquitous that they are now sexual fetish objects. Zombie Strippers is not porn, in the sense that there are real people having real sex in front of a camera, but it might as well be for all of the skin — most of it decomposing, mind you — that is paraded on screen. And the fact that Jenna Jameson is the lead actor, though in the commentary she certainly wants to separate herself from her "former” porn career. (She can call herself an "ex-porn star” all she wants but we’ll never forget.) Jameson is a Nietzsche-reading stripper (shocking, I know) who becomes zombified after a poorly contained government virus escapes via a combatant that slips into the local rippers. Once she has her throat torn out, she’s reborn as a fully functional zombie stripper — she can talk, dance and strip better than ever, looking even sexier with blood stains and a gorgeously gaping hole in her throat. She earns big cash for her rowdy routine and lap dances, one of which ends in her eating a customer’s penis. From there, Zombie Strippers unfolds just as you’d expect: the troops come in and clean up the mess, everyone you’d expect to get bitten does (including the inexhaustible Robert Englund as the club’s sleazy owner) and a strip-off between two rivals occurs where Jameson shoots both ping pong and pool balls from her fanny (the UK one, not the American one). Billed as a political satire, director Lee certainly doesn’t hide his leftist slant, blaming the Dubya/Schwarzenegger administration for the outbreak, as well as warring with Canada, among other things. And yet, despite the gratuitousness of it all, not to mention the unforgivably awful CGI and the unexplained reasoning behind why the strippers can talk and dance while the others move like a Romero flick, Zombie Strippers is an entertaining B-movie that knows no shame. Featurette "The Champagne Room” is full of even more laughs, as some of the cast claim the movie has "great underlying meaning, a great story” and "a message” in total deadpan. And if you can stomach Jameson’s constant references to her past career, the commentary is good fun. (Sony)